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Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

A lot will be happening in the upcoming weeks (see also our ->events page).

We will continue our well-received series of “Wednesday Weekly Webinars” with Annika Klyver’s talk about her Milky Way enterprise maps and further Architectural Thinking topics.

November will be a hot month for us:

  • It starts with a ->surprise on November 5th that unveils some exciting news
  • Architectural Thinking will be very present at this year’s ->Intersection conference, so register to listen to world-class keynotes and the latest developments on Enterprise Design and Architectural Thinking.
  • We are very proud that our ->book will be launched on Nov 18th

 

So – stay tuned and visit our ->events page every now and then!

Wolfgang

AT#61: Start Intentionally Designing Your Becoming!

AT#61: Start Intentionally Designing Your Becoming!

I’ve just read this statement from Wolfgang at least 10 times and like the picture that you can see an old or young lady in – my brain keeps switching between the two views.

The “shift from fixing their being” conjures up a continuous improvement culture; it leads me to think about evolving the business model and it makes me think about improving on a customer offer that still has some growth left but is pretty mature in the market.

In terms of the leadership style it’s one of metrics, data, focused on science and logic and is about reporting improvements on a month by month basis and keeping teams focused and moving towards a clear stable outcome. Read More

AT#60: Three Steps to Regain Control Over Your IT Landscape

AT#60: Three Steps to Regain Control Over Your IT Landscape

Most IT landscapes of larger companies consist of hundreds of applications that are interconnected via poorly designed interfaces. In most companies, these IT landscapes already have an enormous technical debt (i.e., an ‘unnecessary complexity’). In my experience, a company typically runs between 80% and 90% more IT applications (and therefore also servers, databases, networks, costs) compared to what would be needed if it had implemented the ideal architecture. A tremendous waste of money and resources, and the reason why IT is perceived as tardy and as a cost factor and not as an enabler. From my point of view, there are three major reasons for this disastrous situation:

Business Units are not aware of their responsibility for their applications and do not think architecturally

There is a tendency to blame the IT department for this situation, but that’s not true. It’s a business problem. Requirements are typically not consolidated well across departments. IT has always just been the contractor who had to implement those punctual requirements under time pressure. Read More

AT#54: How to Open the Negotiation Space

AT#54:  How to Open the Negotiation Space

Viewpoints of many different disciplines need to be considered in order to implement a holistically designed enterprise. Interests of disciplines closer to purpose and customer value (like service- or UX designers) must be negotiated with disciplines closer to feasibility (like business- or software architects). Designs of those groups can be conflicting, drafts of UX designers, for example, might not be feasible with proper software design or due to limited budgets.

Today those disciplines are having hard times with each other. Designers are often frustrated because their designs are never implemented in the way they envisioned. IT-Architects are frustrated because everybody perceives them as not willing to implement a certain design. Executives are feeling that the money they invest hardly ever leads to the intended outcomes. A lot of misconceptions and conflicts between designers, architects and executives arise that are usually resolved by corporate politics, not the best way to optimize overall enterprise design. Read More

AT#20 – Why Digital Transformation Fails without Architecture

AT#20 – Why Digital Transformation Fails without Architecture

Structure not only increases our chance to success,
it makes us more efficient at it.’ – Marshall Goldsmith

When people discuss digital transformation, they talk mostly about innovation, agility and new technologies. Companies put a tremendous amount of effort into initiatives that should make them more agile and innovative, but most of the companies I know do not manage their innovation initiatives towards a big architectural picture. The overly complex structure of dependencies between innovation- and other projects, and between new technologies and legacy-IT, are not handled with intent. Just present a fancy technology to top-level executives. If it has a low time-to-market and includes AI, chances are high that you can do it. No matter if it’s integration with legacy IT results in unnecessary complexity, ‘technical debt’ that introduces a total cost of ownership that outnumbers the business benefits by far. No matter if it is architecturally sound.

Let’s have a closer look at what ‘architecturally sound’ means, what architecture is all about and why the concept of architecture is helpful, especially in the context of innovation: Read More

AT#59: Architectural Thinking @ Intersection Conference!

AT#59: Architectural Thinking @ Intersection Conference!

Save the date: we’re launching the Intersection Conference as a one week combined inspiration, coaching and case format for learning Enterprise Design (designing better enterprises) and Architectural Thinking, local and virtual, 10-14 November.

For #enterprisearchitecture #businessarchitecture pros: learn to drive innovation from the outside ecosystem, starting from customer experience and product innovation.
For #experiencedesign #businessdesign #servicedesign pros: learn to transform the inside delivery processes, organisations and ecosystems that bring experiences to life.
For #executives and #entrepreneurs: make rapid leaps into the future of your enterprise, and map out the change required to get there.

Register here: -> https://2020.intersectionconf.com/

Wolfgang

AT#58: Information? Data? Content?

AT#58: Information? Data? Content?

If you work in IT, you are probably familiar with data modelling. Even terms like data and information architecture may appear familiar to you. But what do they mean to you and is it really important to understand the difference?

Reintroducing “Information”

I started thinking about it in the context of the most recent projects I’ve been working on, which happened to be in the fields of web content management and e-commerce. If you are familiar with these worlds, you probably know that digital practitioners use the term Information Architecture with a somewhat different meaning compared to what more traditional IT specialists may do (according to some surveys [1], half of IT professionals do not see the difference between data and information. Well, at least did not see it back in 2013 when that particular article was published).

So, what is an information architecture in a digital context? I would define it as follows:

Information architecture (or IA) is a process and an artefact of designing the structure of meaningful information in a way that maximises the efficiency of interaction between the user (the consumer of information) and the medium.

When we are talking about web technologies, IA often manifests in the design of navigation menus and pathways that ease the pain of finding the information for the users. It also includes matters like labelling and search systems for the same purpose[2].

The definition implies that to be considered an information object, a piece of data needs to deliver value to the user in the specific moment of interaction. The same data presented in a different part of the customer journey or on a different stage of the business process may lose its value, thus stops being considered as “information”.

If you are after a formal definition, I find this one really good [3]:

Information is any collection of data that is processed, analysed, interpreted, organised, classified or communicated in order to serve a useful purpose, present facts or represent knowledge in any medium or form.

I love the part about “a useful purpose”, it unifies the way UX designers think about information when designing digital experiences and the way enterprise architects should think about information when dealing with business matters. The same paper defines information architecture as:

Information architecture is the means of providing a structured description of an enterprise’s information, the relationship of this information to business requirements and processes, applications and technology, and the processes and rules which govern it

OK, this is one may already be a bit too governmenty and over-enterprisey, so probably let’s stick to the first definition given above 🙂

Now, how is it related to the term “content”?

Today, if you are even remotely close to marketing, you will hear this word everywhere hundreds of times a day. Everybody is talking about content management, content development, content strategy, content delivery, etc…

I came across this definition the other day [4]:

“Content is the presentation of information for a purpose to an audience through a channel in a form.”

Which made me thinking: how is it different from the definition of information that we introduced before? Not really, for a small nuance — when we say content, we usually mean something specifically crafted for its purpose.

My answer (again, probably biased towards web projects) is that:

“Content” can be defined as information purposefully and consciously produced and curated by an organisation.

In the marketing world, examples of content by this definition are articles, ads, product descriptions and so on. In the technical world of IT, it may be user manuals or process specifications. In a broader sense (and giving kudos to Apache Jackrabbit and JCR [5]), software code can also be classified as content, but let’s not debate about it here 😉

So when we are talking about “Content architecture”, we are talking about organising the information for the ease of production, so that later on it can be converted into information architecture for the ease of consumption.

Let’s take any website as an example. It has a navigation menu and search and filters on the front-end — all the instruments for the website visitors to find what they are looking for. This is defined by the information architecture (IA) of the website.

At the same time, if you are logged into the back-office, you will see a set of content folders and labels and so on. This organisation is created by and for the people producing the information via a given tool; therefore it will be guided by the “content architecture”.

Where is “data” then?

If we assume all the statements above as being true, what is left for “data”?

Unlike “information”, “data” can be considered as raw records requiring processing and interpretation to become valuable.

Unlike “content”, “data” is captured and recorded but not necessarily crafted by the organisation.

A great example of “data” is records collected by web analytics engine, such as Google Analytics. Those are merely recordings of observed phenomena. In order to become valuable, they need skill and expertise to be interpreted and presented in a way that will allow making weighted decisions.

This leads us to the concept of data architecture [6]:

Data architecture is composed of models, policies, rules or standards that govern which data is collected, and how it is stored, arranged, integrated, and put to use in data systems and in organizations.

Let’s bring the three together

Concluding, the content architecture will guide the storage and structure of the content that the organisation is producing so that it can be navigated and managed by the content producers.

The data architecture will structure the storage, collection, and management of observations made by the business.

And finally, the information architecture will define how you pull, transform and represent the content and data in a meaningful way that allows consumers of that information to find it easily in the moments when it matters.

Read More

AT#56: Enterprise Architects – Broaden Your Field of Vision!

AT#56: Enterprise Architects – Broaden Your Field of Vision!

The typical career of enterprise architects (EAs) starts with IT-related studies. EAs then move from software engineering to software architecture and finally to EA. As a logical consequence, EA is still driven by an engineering mindset even if some EAs have moved to the field of business architecture. You can feel the rational, analytical approach to design enterprises in almost any diagram or map created by EAs – quite often ugly but precise. Read More